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I’m 20 and Never Had a Job Before

How does employment even work?

Photo from Daily Mail

Does anyone else feel as if the process of applying for jobs is more stressful than the actual part of working?

Well, I have never actually held a formal job before in my 20 years of living, so maybe I shouldn’t be talking.

For the past few weeks, I’ve been going through an endless cycle of refreshing Indeed, handing out resumes, and going to interviews that are either ten minutes long or over an hour.

Unfortunately, as you can read from the title, I am still unemployed.

I honestly wish that the employer would just tell you right after the interview that you have little to no chance of getting the job. It is stressful when they reassure you that you are a strong candidate and that they will get back to you by the end of the week, but never do… What is with the burden of false hope?

When I was in high school, my parents never pressured me or even wanted me to get a job. They told me to just relax, spend time with my friends, and focus on my studies to get into the university of my choice.

Nowadays, as I look back, I am both grateful and discouraged at the fact that I have no work experience. On one hand, I feel very fortunate for my parent’s endless support of my dreams. On the other, I feel like a child compared to my friends who have developed years of work experience and skills.

I remember thinking that getting a job was going to be such an easy task. There was a hiring sign on the window of almost every shop and even 14-year-olds were employed.

Facing rejection fills my mind with endless questions that keep me up at night.

Is there a problem with my resume or cover letter? Are my interviewing skills incompetent? Can they really not trust me to flip a burger or fold a pair of shorts? Are businesses trying to hire less employees due to the drastic increase of Ontario’s minimum wage? Why did I choose to attend a university that is two hours away from home?

My greatest disadvantage that I have encountered so far is the fact that I am a student only in my hometown for the summer. Quite frankly, I understand that the employer would benefit more when hiring an individual that could stay throughout the year as opposed to a few months. But, I just want to be productive and not sit around killing time. I sometimes want to state to the employer that I would be willing to work below minimum wage…

Maybe I am just trying to find someone or something to blame.

After writing this post, I realized that I sound silly for complaining about not working. I am extremely grateful for my parents wanting me to have a memorable childhood filled with fun trips to the park, sunshine and love, happiness and love.

If I can’t find employment currently, I think that it’s best to work on self-improvement, self-love, or perhaps taking up a new hobby.

I am also inspired by my friends to stay positive and motivated, as it amazes me how some are working extremely hard to support themselves fully in terms of paying their own rent and tuition. They must truly be superheroes.

To those that are also trying to find new employment or thinking of a career change, I wish you the best of luck and thank you very much for reading my first post!

Stay tuned for when I find employment someday and write a post complaining about the struggles of having a full-time job.

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